Gut check: Metabolites shed by intestinal microbiota keep inflammation at bay

Researchers have elucidated a mechanism by which ‘good’ bacteria that reside in our gastrointestinal tract can help protect us from inflammation, and how their disruption (dysbiosis) can increase the susceptibility of the liver to more harmful forms of disease. Their study identified two key metabolites produced by the bacteria in mice that modulate inflammation in the host and could ultimately reduce the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Source: Gut check: Metabolites shed by intestinal microbiota keep inflammation at bay: Researchers find inflammatory response in fatty liver disease is reduced by two tryptophan metabolites from gut bacteria — ScienceDaily

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Insight into blood signatures of inflammation

A new study identifies a pattern of inflammation associated with cardio-metabolic risks among participants in the Black Women’s Health Study, as well as two independent groups of vulnerable women. These findings could help under-served patients benefit from precision medicine and personalized profiles of disease risk.

Source: Insight into blood signatures of inflammation: Findings could lead to better clinical decision making for underserved patients — ScienceDaily

Dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation: human trials examining the impact of dark chocolate consumption on cognition and other brain functions

Findings from two new studies show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation, while improving memory, immunity and mood.

Source: Dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation: Data represent first human trials examining the impact of dark chocolate consumption on cognition and other brain functions — ScienceDaily

Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease?

What if the symptoms and seriousness of certain inflammatory diseases were linked to time of day? Researchers have been working on this hypothesis, after noting that the seriousness and mortality associated with fulminant hepatitis were dependent on the time at which the disease was induced. Their study, conducted on human cells and mice, shows that the anti-inflammatory action of a biological clock protein could prevent the onset of fulminant hepatitis, by alleviating symptoms and increasing survival rates.

Source: Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease? — ScienceDaily

Inflammation Gets Triggered at Certain Times of Day

A new study reveals that a biological clock protein called Rev-erba is helpful in combating inflammation from hepatitis. Learn more about the study, as well as ways to heal your gut and balance out your circadian rhythms, here.

Source: Inflammation Gets Triggered at Certain Times of Day, Finds New Study

Studies: Diet Edition

Vol. 3 Diet edition

Eat your way to fertility

Higher levels of folic acid, higher even than recommended, have been associated with lower occurrence of infertility, while antioxidant supplementation appears to have little effect on women regarding infertility, but it does help men in that regard. Omega-3 fatty acids have been shown to help fertility in women, and diets favoring “seafood, poultry, whole grains, fruits, and vegetables” have been shown to increase fertility in women and improve general semen quality.

goo.gl/8rWiFB

Diet, fasting, and anti-inflammation

Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) directly inhibits NLRP3, which is a gene that plays a key role in inflammation, which leads to “autoimmune diseases, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, and autoinflammatory disorders.” BHB is produced by fasting, high-intensity exercise, caloric restriction, or a very low carbohydrate diet. Mice were set up on a ketogenic diet (read my post on that) and the study found that “…results suggest that the endogenous metabolites like BHB that are produced during low-carb dieting, fasting, or high-intensity exercise can lower NLRP3…”

goo.gl/Fke4Qo

Fats, fats, and more fats!

No link between increased dietary intake of fats and cardiovascular disease. Also, an increasd fat intake is associated with lower mortality. Hurray for the ketogenic diet! “…researchers demonstrated that high carbohydrate intake was associated with an increased risk of mortality, and total fat, as well as individual types of fat, was associated with a lower mortality.” So, higher amounts of carbs can lead to higher mortality rates, but not heart disease. But it gets better for the case FOR fat, “…researchers demonstrated that lowering saturated fats and increasing polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats was associated with lower rates of cardiovascular disease.”

goo.gl/PtKjrd