Study uncovers cause of pesticide exposure, Parkinson’s link

Previous studies have found an association between two commonly used agrochemicals (paraquat and maneb) and Parkinson’s disease. Now a professor has determined that low-level exposure to the pesticides disrupts cells in a way that mimics the effects of mutations known to cause Parkinson’s disease. Adding the effects of the chemicals to a predisposition for Parkinson’s disease drastically increases the risk of disease onset.

Source: Study uncovers cause of pesticide exposure, Parkinson’s link: Low-level exposure to the pesticides disrupts cells in a way that mimics the effects of mutations known to cause Parkinson’s disease — ScienceDaily

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Experimental drug eases effects of gluten for celiac patients on gluten-free diet

An investigational new drug offers hope of relief for celiac disease patients who are inadvertently exposed to gluten while on a gluten-free diet. Inadvertent exposure to gluten can be a frequent occurrence for celiac patients that triggers symptoms, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, due to intestinal damage.

Source: Experimental drug eases effects of gluten for celiac patients on gluten-free diet: First proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714 (anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody) potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure — ScienceDaily

Processes in the gut that drive fat build-up around the waist

Research into the role the gut plays in processing and distributing fat could pave the way for the development of personalized treatments for obesity and other chronic diseases within the next decade.

Source: Processes in the gut that drive fat build-up around the waist: Breakthrough could lead to personalized obesity treatments within a decade — ScienceDaily

Nutrition researchers agree sugar-sweetened beverages increase risk of cardiometabolic disease

While calories from any food have the potential to increase the risk of obesity and other cardiometabolic diseases, nutrition researchers agree that sugar-sweetened beverages play a unique role in chronic health problems.

Source: Some calories more harmful than others: Nutrition researchers agree sugar-sweetened beverages increase risk of cardiometabolic disease — ScienceDaily

Studies: Huntington, Crohn’s, Eggs, and Aging

Vol. 10

Eating Schedule and Huntington Disease

Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited progressive disease that can cause involuntary movements and psychological problems. Symptoms of HD appear in adulthood and worsen over time. Children with at least one parent with HD have a 50% chance of developing HD. As of now, HD is thought to be caused by the buildup of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) and there is no known cure. HD is linked to a problem with autophagy (cell death). The University of British Columbia (UBC) published research involving a mouse model of HD. Mice were restricted to a 6 hour eating windown, which prompted autophagy in the mice. There are practical applications for humans utilizing intermittent fasting, or a fasting mimetic diet.

https://goo.gl/wZNs8x

 

Eggs and Infants

Eggs. They are good for you, this much is made more and more obvious every day. Recently though, the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, published research stating that eggs are beneficial for infants as well.

Starting at 6 months of age, infants were fed eggs (whole eggs) as part of their diet. The infants, aged 6-9 months, were fed 1 egg per day. Eggs, being high in choline precursors, DHA, vitamins A, B12, selenium and other fatty acids, are vital for brain development.

https://goo.gl/QoNTZd

 

Artificial Sweeteners and Crohn’s

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found artificial sweeteners (splenda, maltodextrin, and sucralose) worsened the symptoms of people with Crohn’s disease. Accorfding to the research, the artificial sweeteners increased the presence of proteobacteria and myeloperoxidase. Both of these are involved in inflammatory and autoimmune responses in people with Crohn’s. Researchers did not find the same reaction in people that do not suffer from Crohn’s.

https://goo.gl/HMuTPs

 

Exercise Slows Aging

Yet another reason to regularly exercise. The University of Birmingham and Kings College, London conducted research regarding exercise and aging. The study consisted of 125 participants, aged 55-79, 84 males and 41 females. Excluded from the study were smokers, heavy drinkers, and those who had high blood pressure. A control group of 75 non-exercisers was measured as well. The treatment group, the exercisers, had no loss of muscle mass or strength, no increase in body fat or cholesterol and their testosterone levels remained stable. The immune systems of the exercisers was also comparable to a younger person. One reason for this, according to the researchers, was that exercise prevented the shrinking of the thymus, which normally begins around age 20.

https://goo.gl/AfRLa5

 

The enemy within: Gut bacteria drive autoimmune disease

Bacteria found in the small intestines of mice and humans can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response, according to a new study. The researchers also found that the autoimmune reaction can be suppressed with an antibiotic or vaccine designed to target the bacteria, they said.

Source: The enemy within: Gut bacteria drive autoimmune disease — ScienceDaily

Brain aging may begin earlier than expected

Physicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and aging related diseases.

Source: Brain aging may begin earlier than expected — ScienceDaily