Breast cancer linked to the body’s internal clock

For years, doctors have associated the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations with an increased risk of breast cancer. But researchers have now identified another gene that may have an impact on breast cancer –associated with the body’s circadian rhythm.

Source: Breast cancer linked to the body’s internal clock — ScienceDaily

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Evening use of light-emitting tablets may disrupt healthy sleep

A new study reveals that evening use of light-emitting tablets can induce delays in desired bedtimes, suppress secretion of melatonin (the hormone that regulates sleep and wakefulness), and impair next-morning alertness.

Source: Evening use of light-emitting tablets may disrupt healthy sleep — ScienceDaily

Researchers discover connection between circadian rhythm and aggression

A research team has discovered a circuit in the brains of mice connecting circadian rhythm to aggressive behavior. The discovery is particularly interesting to Alzheimer’s patients who experience increased aggression at night. The researchers have developed special protein tools capable of turning off the cells in the brain causing the behavior.

Source: Researchers discover connection between circadian rhythm and aggression — ScienceDaily

Poor grades tied to class times that don’t match our biological clocks: Schedules of night owls, morning larks and daytime finches may predict their educational outcomes

It may be time to tailor students’ class schedules to their natural biological rhythms. A study shows that students whose circadian rhythms were out of sync with their class schedules received lower grades due to ‘social jet lag,’ a condition in which peak alertness times are at odds with work, school or other demands.

Source: Poor grades tied to class times that don’t match our biological clocks: Schedules of night owls, morning larks and daytime finches may predict their educational outcomes. — ScienceDaily

Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease?

What if the symptoms and seriousness of certain inflammatory diseases were linked to time of day? Researchers have been working on this hypothesis, after noting that the seriousness and mortality associated with fulminant hepatitis were dependent on the time at which the disease was induced. Their study, conducted on human cells and mice, shows that the anti-inflammatory action of a biological clock protein could prevent the onset of fulminant hepatitis, by alleviating symptoms and increasing survival rates.

Source: Could the biological clock be a key ally in the fight against inflammatory disease? — ScienceDaily

Inflammation Gets Triggered at Certain Times of Day

A new study reveals that a biological clock protein called Rev-erba is helpful in combating inflammation from hepatitis. Learn more about the study, as well as ways to heal your gut and balance out your circadian rhythms, here.

Source: Inflammation Gets Triggered at Certain Times of Day, Finds New Study