Junk food, energy drinks may pose unique risks for teens, new data shows

The popularity of energy drinks and junk food might have unique risks for teenagers who consume too much of them during the later stages of brain development. These are just two of the factors potentially affecting teen brain development examined in a new special issue of Birth Defects Research: The Teenage Brain, published by the Teratology Society with John Wiley & Sons.

Source: Junk food, energy drinks may pose unique risks for teens, new data shows: Influences on teen brain development the focus of special Teratology Society journal issue — ScienceDaily

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Fit Women And Dementia

Physically fit women are less likely to develop dementia, claims a recent study conducted by the University of Gothenburg and published in American Academy of Neurology.

Women who are physically fit are up to 90% less likely to develop dementia in their lives, the University of Gothenburg concluded from their study. And if the fit women did develop dementia it was, on average, 11 years later in life.

A longitudinal study, spanning decades, measured fitness levels in women with an average age of 50. Average fitness levels were determined using VO2 max and power (watts) output. The average level of fitness they calculated, was 103 watts. To be considered “physically fit” power output needed to be at 120 watts or more. “Unfit” was 80 watts or less.

One interesting aspect of the study: as in most longitudinal studies, participants drop out as time goes on. In this study, 45% of the women who dropped out went on to develop dementia.

Some limitations of this study are:

  • Small number of participants: Only 191 women at the start of the study
  • Little randomization of participants: All of the women were Swedish
  • Fitness levels measured only once, at the start of the study

https://goo.gl/AFp5JR

Brain aging may begin earlier than expected

Physicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and aging related diseases.

Source: Brain aging may begin earlier than expected — ScienceDaily

Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby’s brain

When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new study suggests.

Source: Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby’s brain — ScienceDaily

The end of yo-yo dieting? Brain switch that controls fat burning uncovered

Scientists have discovered a molecular switch in the brain that regulates fat burning — and could provide a way to control weight gain following dieting.

Source: The end of yo-yo dieting? Brain switch that controls fat burning uncovered — ScienceDaily

Older adults grow just as many new brain cells as young people

Researchers show for the first time that healthy older men and women can generate just as many new brain cells as younger people.

Source: Older adults grow just as many new brain cells as young people — ScienceDaily