Exercise could make the heart younger: Mice make over four times as many new heart muscle cells when they exercise

After a heart attack, patients must create new heart muscle cells to heal. A new study shows that mice make more new heart muscle cells when they exercise compared to when they do not. This was true for both healthy mice and those that had experienced a heart attack. Findings demonstrate that one reason exercise is beneficial to health is that it increases the heart’s capacity to regenerate.

Source: Exercise could make the heart younger: Mice make over four times as many new heart muscle cells when they exercise, study finds — ScienceDaily

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Children are as fit as endurance athletes

Researchers discover how young children seem to run around all day without getting tired: their muscles resist fatigue and recover in the same way as elite endurance athletes. The study, which compared energy output and post-exercise recovery rates of young boys, untrained adults and endurance athletes, can be used to develop athletic potential in children and improve our knowledge of how disease risk, such as diabetes, increases as our bodies change from childhood to adulthood.

Source: Children are as fit as endurance athletes — ScienceDaily

Six years of exercise — or lack of it — may be enough to change heart failure risk

By analyzing reported physical activity levels over time in more than 11,000 American adults, researchers conclude that increasing physical activity to recommended levels over as few as six years in middle age is associated with a significantly decreased risk of heart failure, a condition that affects an estimated 5 million to 6 million Americans.

Source: Six years of exercise — or lack of it — may be enough to change heart failure risk — ScienceDaily

Factors promoting physical activity in childhood

Researchers show that the more accurately children assess their motor competences, the more positive is the effect on their physical activity.

Source: Factors promoting physical activity in childhood: Connection between the accuracy of children’s self-assessment of their motor competence and their physical health — ScienceDaily

Studies: Huntington, Crohn’s, Eggs, and Aging

Vol. 10

Eating Schedule and Huntington Disease

Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited progressive disease that can cause involuntary movements and psychological problems. Symptoms of HD appear in adulthood and worsen over time. Children with at least one parent with HD have a 50% chance of developing HD. As of now, HD is thought to be caused by the buildup of mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) and there is no known cure. HD is linked to a problem with autophagy (cell death). The University of British Columbia (UBC) published research involving a mouse model of HD. Mice were restricted to a 6 hour eating windown, which prompted autophagy in the mice. There are practical applications for humans utilizing intermittent fasting, or a fasting mimetic diet.

https://goo.gl/wZNs8x

 

Eggs and Infants

Eggs. They are good for you, this much is made more and more obvious every day. Recently though, the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, published research stating that eggs are beneficial for infants as well.

Starting at 6 months of age, infants were fed eggs (whole eggs) as part of their diet. The infants, aged 6-9 months, were fed 1 egg per day. Eggs, being high in choline precursors, DHA, vitamins A, B12, selenium and other fatty acids, are vital for brain development.

https://goo.gl/QoNTZd

 

Artificial Sweeteners and Crohn’s

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University found artificial sweeteners (splenda, maltodextrin, and sucralose) worsened the symptoms of people with Crohn’s disease. Accorfding to the research, the artificial sweeteners increased the presence of proteobacteria and myeloperoxidase. Both of these are involved in inflammatory and autoimmune responses in people with Crohn’s. Researchers did not find the same reaction in people that do not suffer from Crohn’s.

https://goo.gl/HMuTPs

 

Exercise Slows Aging

Yet another reason to regularly exercise. The University of Birmingham and Kings College, London conducted research regarding exercise and aging. The study consisted of 125 participants, aged 55-79, 84 males and 41 females. Excluded from the study were smokers, heavy drinkers, and those who had high blood pressure. A control group of 75 non-exercisers was measured as well. The treatment group, the exercisers, had no loss of muscle mass or strength, no increase in body fat or cholesterol and their testosterone levels remained stable. The immune systems of the exercisers was also comparable to a younger person. One reason for this, according to the researchers, was that exercise prevented the shrinking of the thymus, which normally begins around age 20.

https://goo.gl/AfRLa5

 

Neurons derived from super-obese people respond differently to appetite hormones

Scientists have successfully generated hypothalamic-like neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) taken from the blood and skin cells of super-obese individuals and people with a normal body weight. The researchers found that the brain cells derived from the super obese were more likely to dysregulate hormones related to feeding behavior and hunger, as well as obesity-related genes and metabolic pathways.

Source: Neurons derived from super-obese people respond differently to appetite hormones — ScienceDaily

30 in 30

I’ve mentioned the Slow-Carb diet (SCD) before. It’s a great way to lose fat, feel and look better, and it’s pretty simple. One of the key components of the SCD is 30 in 30. The goal is to ingest 30 grams of protein within 30 minutes of waking up.

slow carb diet
Woman sleeping

30 in 30

Aiming for 30 grams of protein within 30 minutes of waking up is not an arbitrary thing. Achieving this, or as close as possible, will promote fat loss, boost energy and metabolism, increase satiation, suppress appetite, improve BMI longterm, and help to reduce craving for carbs (junk food).

 

How

When it comes to actually ingesting the 30 grams, there are plenty of ways to do it. Seeing the number “30” might seem like a lot of protein, but it’s really not. With real, whole foods you can eat:

  • 5 eggs
  • 150 grams of sausage
  • ¾ C of beans/lentils
  • 1 C cottage cheese
  • 3-4 oz. of tuna

You can also mix and match some of these. The goal is to get the 30 grams of protein, so whatever method is easiest for you and allows for success is the way to go. For example, instead of eating 5 eggs, you could have 3 eggs, 50 grams of sausage, and a fibrous veggie (spinach, broccoli, cauliflower).

eggs slow carb protein
Eggs are a great source of protein, fat, and more

Another method is to use drinks/shakes to get your 30 grams. While not the best way, as drinking calories is not as effective or satiating; if it’s the only way, it’s better than nothing. Some drinks that will get you to or near the 30 grams of protein are:

  • Protein shake- High quality shake will be between 15 to 30 grams. Make sure it doesn’t contain any sugar or soy, and as few carbs as possible
  • Protein bar- Same as above, high quality. Avoid, sugar and carbs
  • Protein coffee- Make your own or buy some
  • Smoothie with added protein or collagen powder

 

Ideal Uses

The SCD and the 30 in 30 protocol is not best for everyone. It is an optimal way of eating for those who:

  • Are not regularly eating well
  • Have a slower metabolism
  • Frequently crave carbs/sweets
  • Have low energy
  • Do not eat enough protein
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